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Futuristic Fashion and Doja Cat's Aesthetic
Futuristic Fashion and Doja Cat's Aesthetic
Futuristic Fashion and Doja Cat's Aesthetic

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Futuristic Fashion

Futuristic Fashion and Doja Cat’s Aesthetic

read 4 min

Doja Cat became one of the biggest names in the music industry in the past two years, and the charts can prove it. In fashion, Doja Cat is one of those artists that use style to express themselves in a fun way. Also, the commitment to a concept has become a part of her artistry. 

Being a hit is not the only highlight in Doja Cat’s career. And we saw the versatility in her music since the debut album “Amala.” At the beginning of the ‘Hot Pink’ era, Doja used to wear cat-like looks to go along with her name. Then she went to a disco style and the ’70s-inspired outfits with her No. 1 track “Say So” release.

Now, with over 1.5 million total units sold in the US, her third album “Planet Her” ranks among the top 100 most streamed albums of all time on Spotify. And it established a Futuristic Fashion as an aesthetic. Last year, Doja Cat started to use the futuristic style with some luxury fashion like Givenchy items and mixed with custom creations by emerging designers.

Futuristic Fashion and Alien Aesthetic 

According to Nicholas Newman, In fashion, the term ‘futuristic’ is often used to describe avant-garde clothing designs. “It could refer to several things, such as the clothing’s method of production, the materials used, or the garment’s design.” We discuss the futuristic fashion in Doja Cat’s aesthetic as an artist in this case. 

We can see the futuristic aesthetic, and high fashion is creating her personality with interpretations from her stylist and Creative Director, Brett Alan Nelson. “She and I get each other so well,” Brett Nelson said about his work with Doja in an interview with Vogue.

He also said to Vogue: “We bicker like brother and sister, but I know her, sometimes better than she knows herself. She’s down to have fun, take risks, and she trusts me, which in my industry, that is the best thing a creative could ever ask for.”

The exciting thing about the futuristic theme in fashion is that it works well with authentic and a mix of things. As a versatile artist, futuristic fashion seems to work pretty well with Doja Cat.  

Doja’s Futuristic Fashion mixes technology, sexiness, and alien style. Brett Alan Nelson said that The Fifth Element (1997) was an inspiration source for the looks we see in the “Need To Know” music video. Doja Cat is in all green paint, and the video clip brings references to space and sci-fi movies aesthetics, like Guardians of the Galaxy. 

Aesthetic and Identidy

In an interview with InStyle, Brett Alan Nelson said, “You’re never going to be able to really create futurism unless you can do a hodgepodge mix of things. Because, if you really think about [it], even today, people dress from all different eras,” Nelson explains. “That’s really what our future is. People are always going to be inspired by the past.” 

Of course, we can see that this aesthetic is also applied to her song. We can hear a mix of ethereal vocals in the ‘Need to Know’ track and a few melodically harsh raps clash. At this point, we can see that this futuristic fashion is way more than an aesthetic of the Planet Her era, but maybe it is becoming what Doja Cat is in this industry. This is probably the result of her commitment to concepts or a real Doja Cat’s identity. We will see more about this on her following projects.

Artists often explore identity in music to express themselves or a persona, and either way is interesting to see how they question things out by using art to do so. We can make a list of artists that created a creative aesthetic based on their identity, like The Weeknd for After Hours and DAWN FW eras. And also Billie Eilish with the Happier Than Ever album inspired by Julie London, Peggy Lee, and Frank Sinatra. Very different from each other but very committed with an entire work of art.

Fashion, Fun & Self Expression

Doja Cat is indeed very creative in fashion, and we can’t forget to mention other women’s impact on style. We see a lot of references started by Rihanna, Beyoncé, Jenet Jackson, Missy Elliot, and other women artists that are being used these days. Lady Gaga, for example, is the epitome of self-expression. She introduced herself in the music and fashion industry with outrageous fashion. Also, we can’t forget to mention that Chromatica is an excellent example of futuristic fashion, right?

Overall, Doja Cat has made it clear that she expresses herself in fashion with a bit of fun and doesn’t show insecurity about doing it, and we love to see it. Either on dressed as a neon worm, as she did on the 2021 VMAs, or in a concept of a “crazy cat lady,” is fun to see how Doja Cat is having fun. And it is inspiring too. 

You may like this article: Fenty Effect: How Rihanna Created a Humanized Path to Fashion

What’s Next?

The futurism style Doja’s been creating is due to mixing and innovating styles. Doja Cat is a music star but also a versatile fashion icon. This identity was designed not only in Planet Her era but has also built the Doja Cat’s fashion style. The seek for innovation, creativity, and to take risks is undoubtedly a feature of Doja’s and her Creative Director. 

Now, we are really excited to see more about Doja Cat’s visual in the following eras, and if the futuristic fashion will still be present like in Planet Her era, once it fits so well with the singer. We can say that we have big expectations of what there is to come from her in fashion. 

Did you like this article? Don’t forget to check this one out: And Just Like That, Sex and the City’s New Chapter is Full of Fashionable Possibilities. 

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Credits:

Júlia Dara

Editorial Team

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Author:

Júlia Dara

Editorial Team

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